HOW TO DISINFECT YOUR HOME IN THE TIMES OF CORONAVIRUS

Your big guns: Soap, a bleach solution or rubbing alcohol and hot water is your best bet for keeping your home sanitized.

HOW TO MAKE DISINFECTANT AT HOME

For your high-touch surfaces, the Centers for Disease Control recommends a bleach solution diluted with water, or a 70% alcohol solution

FOLLOW THIS BLEACH RECIPE:

5 tablespoons (1/3 cup) bleach per gallon of water, or 4 teaspoons of bleach per quarter of water.

THINGS TO TAKE CARE WHILE USING BLEACH

  • sure to properly ventilate when disinfecting with bleach.
  • And check to see if your bleach has expired. Who knew it could? After about 9 months to a year, and if it smells less bleachy, it’s lost its Make disinfecting power.
  • Don’t mix bleach with anything other than water; otherwise, it could set off a dangerous chemical reaction. For instance, bleach + alcohol is a deadly combo.
  • Contact time is another key aspect of surface sanitizing. "Disinfection isn't instantaneous," [For a bleach solution], you need to leave it on the surface for 10 minutes before wiping it off. "
  • Disinfecting with bleach isn’t actually cleaning. If you also need to clean your countertops of dirt and grime, do that first with soap and water. Then use the bleach solution or rubbing alcohol to combat the virus.
  • Finally, when you work with disinfectants, practice some self care. Alcohol and bleach can be very aggressive on your skin, so wearing rubber gloves can help protect your hands.

HOW TO DISINFECT YOUR HOME IF YOU DON'T HAVE BLEACH?

Regular old rubbing alcohol (isopropyl alcohol or ethyl alcohol) works, so long as it’s at least 70% alcohol, according to the CDC. The alcohol concentration will be listed on the bottle. Rubbing alcohol you buy should already be diluted, unlike bleach.

THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND WHILE CLEANING

  • Wear disposable gloves to clean and disinfect.
  • Clean surfaces using soap and water, then use disinfectant.
  • Cleaning with soap and water reduces number of germs, dirt and impurities on the surface. Disinfecting kills germs on surfaces.

HIGH TOUCH SURFACES THAT NEED YOUR ATTENTION

Tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

SURFACES

Not All Floors Can Handle Bleach

For your nonporous floors, like those in the bathroom, the CDC recommends mopping with the bleach solution.

Avoid bleach on hardwood and other porous floors because of staining. Instead, use a disinfecting wet mop cloth without bleach.